Vancouver Fringe Festival 2018 – Banned in the USA

Banned In The USA poster for Edmonton promo.jpgBanned in the USA took a painful hour not getting to the point, and then went 15 minutes over its scheduled time.  This may be the worst fringe performance I have ever seen.

 

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Vancouver Fringe Festival 2018 – Tomatoes Tried to Kill Me But Banjos Saved My Life

tomatoes-tried-to-kill-meTomatoes Tried to Kill Me, But Banjos Saved My Life is a show in the true spirit of Fringe.  The performance will put a smile on your face, leaving you glad and happy.

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Vancouver Fringe Festival 2018 – Poly Queer Love Ballad

A 75 minute Slam Poetry Musical, that is good even if you don’t like Slam Poetry, Musicals, or 75 minute shows.  poly-queer-Love_Ballad_0202-5

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Vancouver Fringe Festival 2018 – Jon Bennett: How I Learned to Hug

how-i-learned-to-hugLikely the funniest show at this year’s festival, Jon Bennett: How I Learned to Hug is a touching and hilarious must-see at the 2018 Vancouver Fringe Festival.

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BOOKS: How Emotions are Made, by Lisa Feldman Barrett

how-emotions-are-made

It is evident from this book that Barret is an accomplished researcher. Further, her research is relevant and interesting — but what is most interesting is how she tries to portray her research. The book could have been far more informative, concise and enjoyable had she not been so obsessed with convincing the reader that her research upsets commonly held beliefs about emotions. Because it does not.

But what is so strange, is that she has chosen to misrepresent the commonly held beliefs, so that her research will appear to contradict them.

 

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BOOKS: Anastasia, by Vladimir Megré

anastasia's flying saucer

Outlining alternate ways to raise children, keep bees, grow crops, and build a spaceship.

Anastasia-cover_01

In search of a method of how to extract a valuable nut oil found in the Russian taiga, the author comes upon a young beautiful forest recluse named Anastasia. She has been living there alone (excepting visits from her grandfather and great-grandfather) since she was a child, because her parents’ brains exploded when they got too close to a tree.(pg 125) The story is presented as a true account, and the series (The Ringing Cedars of Russia) has apparently sold millions of copies and given rise to a religious movement.

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BOOKS: Red Mars, by Kim Stanley Robinson

I’d been looking forward to reading this book for years — for decades. All I knew was that there were three books: Red Mars, Green Mars, and Blue Mars, and that it was about the long term colonization and terraforming of the red planet.

It wasn’t exactly what I was expecting, but it did not disappoint.

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